• Legal Framework

    In-depth coverage of the local legal framework for business is an integral part of OBG’s analysis. Working in partnership with a leading local law firm, we review foreign investment laws, ownership restrictions, requirements for local partners and labour laws, among other topics.
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Companies intending to carry out business in Qatar must have a legal presence in the state. This may be by virtue of a company, branch office, trade representative office or agency relationship. Incorporating a company is usually the most suitable approach if the foreign investor intends to have a long-term presence in Qatar.

 

The Qatari economy, together with all of the other GCC countries, has been affected by the recent economic changes, most notably the fall in oil prices coupled with volatility in the stock markets after China devalued its currency. Due to its vast natural gas reserves and emphasis on liquefied natural gas exports, Qatar is one of the best...

 

Joint ventures (JVs) are a common corporate structure chosen by contractors in Qatar. Two companies interested in pursuing a project together often form a JV to increase their chances of being awarded the contract and to share the cost and risk of performing it. The JV structure provides companies with the opportunity to bid for projects they...

 

Qatar’s Labour Law (Law No. 14 of 2004) and the implementing ministerial resolutions thereof apply to all individuals working in Qatar. The law provides a body of regulations outlining the legal rights, restrictions and obligations of workers, employers and workers’ committees. Qatar’s labour laws are given particular attention both by the...

Chapter | Legal Framework from The Report: Qatar 2016

This chapter contains an outline of the legal framework in which local and foreign investors operate in Qatar, including the rules and regulations for foreign investors, the guidelines for incorporating a new company, a rundown of the foreign property ownership laws and regulations, and a review of the new changes to the Labour Law.

This chapter contains a viewpoint from James Elwen...

With the fall in oil prices underlining the dangers of an over reliance on hydrocarbons revenues, Qatar has continued to forge ahead with its economic diversification drive in 2016. Non-hydrocarbons growth now outstrips hydrocarbons growth, with several big-ticket construction projects, an increasingly dynamic financial services sector and a growing reputation as a tourist destination all fuelling non-oil expansion.