• Construction

    OBG’s Construction sector analysis highlights investment opportunities in the infrastructure, residential, commercial and industrial segments. Government policies are reviewed along with labour, materials and land costs, trends in bank lending and the public tendering process.
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Driven by a growing middle class, rising urbanisation and some of the most attractive prices in the Mediterranean region, Tunisia’s real estate sector offers some of the best potential in North Africa. However, inflation caused by the depreciation of the Tunisian dinar over the last two years, as well as central bank interest rate hikes, have...

 

What is being done to modernise the framework governing the construction sector?

 

Urbanisation is a mega-trend redefining contemporary life in both developed and emerging markets across the world. This mass rural-to-urban movement of people and expansion of cities to absorb formerly isolated villages is a relatively recent phenomenon, at least in the developing world. According to the UN, in 1950, 751m people lived in urban...

 

Despite major economic headwinds in 2018, Tunisia’s construction sector looks to be on the upswing. Over the past few years increasing global oil prices coupled with the depreciation of the Tunisian dinar have seen demand for projects decrease and the cost of materials rise. Additionally, upcoming parliamentary and presidential elections in...

Chapter | Construction & Real Estate from The Report: Tunisia 2019

Despite major economic headwinds in 2018, Tunisia’s construction sector looks to be on the upswing. Over the past few years increasing global oil prices coupled with the depreciation of the Tunisian dinar have seen demand for projects decrease and the cost of materials rise. Additionally, upcoming parliamentary and presidential elections in late 2019 are likely to temporarily stoke uncertainty...

Tunisia has successfully navigated the difficulties of the post-revolutionary period by capably establishing robust democratic institutions. However, the country faces macroeconomic challenges since the 2011 revolution. Budgetary pressures, combined with a devaluation of the dinar and a rise in the level of business informality, have made the current environment a complex one.