Papua New Guinea Agriculture Articles & Analysis

Chapter | Agriculture & Fisheries from The Report: Papua New Guinea 2018

Papua New Guinea’s fertile soils are instrumental in the lives of the country’s residents, both as a source of income and nutrition. The agriculture sector has constituted between 25% and 40% of GDP over the last four decades, while supporting the livelihoods of around 85% of the population. Despite the sector’s importance, however, the evolution of farming has long been restricted by...

Although Papua New Guinea’s macroeconomic slowdown, challenging business climate and falling global commodity prices have weighed on trade and investment in recent years, the country continues to offer high-potential opportunities to investors.

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What role do you see for fisheries in the government’s attempts to diversify the economy?

 

Although the agriculture sector has some significant hurdles to overcome, this has not stopped a host of agri-business projects from sprouting up across the country in recent years. With the gradual inward flow of foreign capital and the adoption of farming-optimisation techniques, agri-business has the potential to be the new growth engine of...

 

Against a backdrop of increasingly severe and financially straining climate events and natural disasters, technology is poised to play an important role in maintaining and improving global agricultural output. The adoption of digital and precision farming practices has been shown to improve crop resiliency, and boost productivity and incomes,...

 

In a bid to increase transparency and ensure that only qualified projects are eligible for government assistance, a complete review of Papua New Guinea’s tax credit scheme (TCS) got under way in the beginning of 2018. The government has utilised the TCS to enhance the commercial viability of infrastructure projects since 2003, albeit with...

 

In an attempt to persuade foreign-owned fishing vessels to process their catches from Papua New Guinea waters at local facilities, Prime Minister Peter O’Neill announced the cancellation of a fishing fee subsidy in December 2017 and replaced it with a rebate for processing seafood onshore. While the move is designed to improve PNG’s fisheries...

 

How would you assess the government’s attempts to improve food self-sufficiency?