Mongolia Tourism

Displaying 7 - 12 of 29
Efforts to highlight Mongolia’s broad range of attractions are paying off, with the tourism industry on course to notch up a decade of sustained growth, a recently published report has concluded.

In a speech delivered at the most recent Mongolian Economic Forum, held in Ulaanbaatar in March 2013, Ts. Oyungerel, the minister of culture, sports and tourism, announced that the government was in the early stages of a plan to develop “special interest tourism” in a handful of key areas, with the long-term goal of boosting the sector’s overall...

Sewage, water and heating systems are attractive products for the Mongolian market.

With tourism activity mostly seasonal, how is the ministry planning to increase the number of skilled workers in the labour force?

Home to vast swathes of untouched land and numerous unique natural environments, Mongolia has immense mountain ranges in the north and the west, thousands of square kilometres of rolling steppe in the central and eastern part of the country, and the austere Gobi desert in the south. The nation also has a distinctive cultural heritage, which...

With temperatures generally hovering below freezing for nine months of the year, Mongolia is one of the planet’s coldest countries. The average temperature in Ulaanbaatar is -2.9°C, making it the coldest capital in the world, and the extreme climate represents a major challenge for tourism operators.

Chapter | Tourism from The Report: Mongolia 2014

Visitor arrivals have jumped substantially in recent years, topping 475,000 in 2012, up 3.4% from the previous year and from less than 150,000 in 2000. As of mid-2013 the government has been working with the private sector to overhaul the country’s tourism regulatory regime and development strategy. In March 2013 the minister of culture, sports and tourism announced that the government had...