Ghana Energy Articles & Analysis

Chapter | Energy & Utilities from The Report: Ghana 2019

The discovery of large offshore oil reserves has had a significant impact on the national balance sheet, with shipments of crude oil representing the second-largest export category in 2017 after gold. Ghana is a relative newcomer to the global hydrocarbons industry, and with proven oil reserves of around 660m barrels and an output of about 126,000 barrels per day, it is a small producer by...

Ghana continues to be one of the most stable countries in sub-Saharan Africa and has developed substantially over the years. Now one of Africa’s fastest-growing economies, the country is starting to move away from traditional resource dependency. However, it faces the challenge of ensuring the widest benefit from that expansion, given its growing and increasingly urbanised population.

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Ghana is turning to renewables as a way to expand its electricity capacity and diversify the energy mix, with the private sector flagged to take the lead in a major project rollout.

 

Ghana’s bid to increase the nation’s solar capacity is taking place across a number of fronts. Most of this capacity is derived from the 20-MW photovoltaic (PV) plant operated by independent producer BXC Ghana. The government has expressed its determination to end reliance on kerosene lanterns in rural regions – which are known to be...

 

Ghana’s energy sector is in a moment of transition. In 2017 oil was the largest source of energy in the country, at 42.5%, closely followed by biomass at 40.6%. This mainly consists of the firewood that has historically been used to heat homes and small businesses. While some traditional energy sources remain popular, new developments are...

 

How would you evaluate the current West African hydrocarbons extraction landscape?

 

How can investment be tailored to meet the increase in demand for electricity?

 

The main benefit of a domestic refining industry is that value is maintained in country, reducing the need to import expensive refined products from elsewhere. This benefit is particularly pronounced with complex refineries, which produce high-value products, such as petrol, and middle distillates, such as home heating oil for the domestic...