• Economic Reports from Oxford Business Group

    Country Reports

    Since 1994, OBG has been at the frontier of mapping new waves of emerging economies. OBG now operates in many of the world's fastest growing markets, offering internationally acclaimed intelligence on regions that are shaping the future balance of economic power.

Displaying 1 to 6 of 188 published reports

Home to an estimated 15% of the world’s proven oil reserves and the single-largest economy in MENA, Saudi Arabia is a key regional and global player. The Vision 2030 blueprint sets out regulatory, budget and social reforms that will be implemented over the coming decade as the nation sets about curbing its reliance on crude oil production and export, which accounted for 43.5% of GDP in 2018.

Its relatively small population and status as the world’s biggest gas exporter have helped Qatar become the richest country globally in terms of GDP per capita, which stood at $72,700 at current prices in 2019, according to IMF estimates. In recent years, however, the nation has faced strong economic headwinds from a drop in global energy prices to a diplomatic blockade.

Sri Lanka’s progress with free trade agreements, finance reforms, and growth strategies for manufacturing and ICT should encourage increased foreign direct investment. Sri Lanka was named the top travel destination for 2019, and the government’s 2025 development strategy aims to increase public-private partnerships, nurture innovation and increase investment in special economic zones.

Abu Dhabi is the largest of the seven emirates that comprise the UAE, in terms of both its land mass and economy, and home to the majority of the country’s energy production and reserves. While the emirate is home to the world’s sixth-largest proven oil reserves, financial buffers have helped it diversify and yield steady non-oil revenues.

Near-term sentiment is on the rise among Dubai’s business leaders, with the IMF forecasting a healthy GDP growth rate of 4.2% in 2019 for the emirate. While not as exposed as some of its regional neighbours to the effects of fluctuating commodities prices in recent times, Dubai nevertheless stands to benefit from the knock-on effects of higher prices over the last year.

A number of key developments in the country are expected to support economic growth in the coming years. A rapidly improving business environment and infrastructural base, the gradual liberalisation of the local currency and increased investment into export-oriented industries are all set to raise living standards and drive the emergence of a large national middle class.