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Report | The Report: The Philippines 2015

The Philippine economy is gradually on the rise, largely driven by its business process outsourcing, industry and construction sectors. The average pace of growth in the Philippines in the first half of the decade was 6.3%, compared to 6% in Indonesia, 5.8% in Malaysia and Vietnam, and 3.6% in Thailand. The government has been widely commended for its efforts to improve business conditions and reduce corruption, while a relatively conservative fiscal policy has helped boost the economy’s credibility and steer investment into the private sector.

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Chapter | The Guide from The Report: Sarawak 2015

Chapter | Legal Framework from The Report: Sarawak 2015

This chapter examines the legal framework environment for doing business in Sarawak, focusing on new sales and purchase agreements, goods and services tax, foreign property investment, minimum wage policy and the variety of visa options available to foreigners. It also contains a viewpoint from Alvin Wong, Managing Partner, Sia, Alvin Wong & Partners.

Chapter | Tax from The Report: Sarawak 2015

This chapter gives an overview of taxation in Sarawak, which is governed by the general policies of the Malaysian federal government. Key areas of focus include double taxation agreements, corporate tax, investment tax allowance, incentives and green technology tax exemptions..

Chapter | Health & Environment from The Report: Sarawak 2015

In common with governments around the world, issues such as rising costs, demographic shifts, technological advances in care and delivering equitable health care to both rural and urban populations are posing challenges to Sarawak’s health authorities. Of the state’s inhabitants, 44% were considered rural in 2013. Yet it has only one major public hospital, Sarawak General, located in the capital Kuching. It is thus important for authorities to devise alternative modes for delivering care. Within the health care sector, the need to address the persistent urban-rural divide and create incentives to attract and retain qualified medical practitioners is likely to be prioritised. As costs rise, the requirement for health care insurance for some workers should energise the state’s insurance industry. There is also much promise for bioprospectors to discover new medical compounds in Sarawak’s rainforests, which could act as a key accelerator for the state’s biomedical economy. 

Chapter | Telecoms & IT from The Report: Sarawak 2015

The Malaysian government is committed to transforming the country’s education system to produce a cadre of graduates armed with the creative and critical thinking skills necessary to thrive and lead in the 21st century’s increasingly international workplaces. The approach is tailored to each area of the country. In Sarawak, which has a higher proportion of rural schools than Peninsular Malaysia, the ministry is prioritising support by providing funds for upgrades to the state’s education infrastructure, among other programmes. Policymakers and educators are clearly on course in planning for the changes Sarawak Corridor of Renewable Energy and other projects will bring to the people of Sarawak. Implementation is key and it is crucial that all of the state’s people gain from the private and public investment now being made in the state’s education system.

This chapter contains interviews with Professor Abdul Rahman Arshad, Chancellor of UCSI University; and Mohamad Abu Bakar bin Marzuki, Director, Yayasan Sarawak.

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Chapter | Education & Training from The Report: Sarawak 2015

The Malaysian government is committed to transforming the country’s education system to produce a cadre of graduates armed with the creative and critical thinking skills necessary to thrive and lead in the 21st century’s increasingly international workplaces. The approach is tailored to each area of the country. In Sarawak, which has a higher proportion of rural schools than Peninsular Malaysia, the ministry is prioritising support by providing funds for upgrades to the state’s education infrastructure, among other programmes. Policymakers and educators are clearly on course in planning for the changes Sarawak Corridor of Renewable Energy and other projects will bring to the people of Sarawak. Implementation is key and it is crucial that all of the state’s people gain from the private and public investment now being made in the state’s education system.

This chapter contains interviews with Professor Abdul Rahman Arshad, Chancellor of UCSI University; and Mohamad Abu Bakar bin Marzuki, Director, Yayasan Sarawak.