Saudi Arabia Construction Articles & Analysis

Chapter | Construction & Engineering from The Report: Saudi Arabia 2016

From 2003 to 2013 Saudi Arabia’s second oil boom brought a decade of prosperity for its construction and engineering sectors, but with the brakes applied to public spending, many businesses face a more challenging landscape in 2016. Work is continuing apace on some of the most prestigious projects, such as the Riyadh Metro and King Abdullah Economic City on the Red Sea, but progress has slowed...

2016 witnessed the launch of the Kingdom’s historic Vision 2030 and the accompanying National Transformation Programme, both of which call for a major overhaul of the state’s economic apparatus and envision a more open market framework and more dynamic, private sector-led growth moving ahead.

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Although they benefitted from more than SR220bn ($58.7bn) per year in new contracts between 2011 and 2014, according to National Commercial Bank, many Saudi construction firms have seen their margins squeezed by escalating costs in recent years. One of the greatest challenges in balancing their books has been the impact of new labour...

 

With population growth of 2.4% in 2015, there is a rising need for housing in Saudi Arabia, and the government has introduced measures to create half a million affordable units for its citizens, only 30% of whom currently own their own homes. The latest initiative is a 2.5% tax on undeveloped land, which was introduced on June 15, 2016.

 

To what extent are factors such as declining oil prices, subsidy cuts and regional challenges adversely impacting the construction industry?

 

From 2003 to 2013 Saudi Arabia’s second oil boom brought a decade of prosperity for its construction and engineering sectors, but with the brakes applied to public spending, many businesses face a more challenging landscape in 2016. Work is continuing apace on some of the most prestigious projects, such as the Riyadh Metro and King Abdullah...

2016 witnessed the launch of the Kingdom’s historic Vision 2030 and the accompanying National Transformation Programme, both of which call for a major overhaul of the state’s economic apparatus and envision a more open market framework and more dynamic, private sector-led growth moving ahead.

 

The building materials sector serves as both a barometer of the wider health of the construction industry and as a critical factor in the bottom line of local contractors. As with the industry in general, sub-sectors such as cement have entered a period of uncertainty. While the government’s extensive development programme has buoyed cement...