Ghana Energy Articles & Analysis

Chapter | Energy & Utilities from The Report: Ghana 2017

Ghana’s energy consumption continues to expand, underlining the urgency of boosting generation capacity and improving access to power. While the government is working to further streamline the utilities sector and increase installed capacity to improve efficiency and ensure supply, it is also looking for private partners to assist with securing funding and reforming a number of its core...

The Ghanaian economy is well positioned to accelerate growth, with several key factors likely to encourage expansion in the coming years.

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What needs to be done to ensure the development of the Tweneboa, Enyenra and Ntomme (TEN) fields remains on schedule?

 

Low oil prices have had a significant impact on producers. According to a 2015 study by consultancy Wood Mackenzie, following the price drop, well over $200bn in spending on oil and gas projects around the world has been deferred, and roughly 250,000 industry employees globally have lost their jobs. This has been magnified in commodity-...

 

Ghana’s current energy shortage and the effects of climate change on a number of sectors are driving the exploration of renewable energy use. Since the country’s electricity needs currently exceed existing supply, and electricity and gas tariffs are increasing, the government is encouraging the diversification of its energy sources, creating a...

 

Even amid the low global oil price environment, Ghana’s energy sector continues to evolve in a positive fashion, with deregulation implemented in the downstream sector and two new oil and gas fields coming on-line. The long-awaited benefits of the country’s oil and gas reserves are also beginning to be felt by the power sector, with the...

 

Even amidst a broader economic slowdown, Ghana’s energy consumption continues to expand, underlining the urgency of boosting generation capacity and improving access to power. Over the past few years, problems with imported supply and low levels of rainfall have constricted feedstock for the country’s power plants, resulting in bouts of load...

 

According to the Association of Ghana Industries’ first quarter 2016 Business Barometer, 71% of businesses cited high utility prices as their primary constraint to growth. Energy-intensive consumers, like those in the industrial sector, were hit hardest by tariff changes. In the first half of 2016 crude oil prices remained relatively stable;...